Five Ways to Commemorate the Battle of Brooklyn

While that water bottle is no more accurate than the one in Downtown Abbey's promo photo from last week, the members of Glover’s Marblehead Regiment, to which this awesomely bearded fellow belongs, promise to give an historically correct recreation of the Battle of Brooklyn this weekend in Dumbo. Photo: Brooklyn Bridge Park

Although that water bottle above would have been as out of place in 1776 as the one in Downtown Abbey‘s promo photo from last week, the members of Glover’s Marblehead Regiment, to which this awesomely bearded fellow belongs, promise to give an historically correct recreation of the Battle of Brooklyn this weekend in Dumbo. Photo: Brooklyn Bridge Park

While July 4 is the pinnacle of patriotism across the country every summer, Aug. 27 is a date that holds a lot of  historical significance for Brooklynites, too, because it was the day the Battle of Brooklyn was waged during the American Revolutionary War.

The battle actually started brewing 238 years ago on Aug. 22 when the British landed at Gravesend Bay in an attempt to capture the city, but the real action took place in Brooklyn Heights on Aug. 27. George Washington and his men may not have walked away the victors, but an ingenious escape to Manhattan saved the Continental Army from capture—and we all know who went on to win the war.

There are plenty of ways to commemorate this momentous occasion in our nation’s history this weekend, including a pub crawl on Aug. 23, which begins at Green-Wood Cemetery and ends in Gowanus; as well as reenactment of the battle itself taking place at Brooklyn Bridge Park at noon on Saturday; a scavenger battle in the Brooklyn Navy Yard; and finally Green-Wood Cemetery is hosting a day of free programming—expect 18th-century living demos to lend an entirely different perspective to the idea of DIY; parades and revolutionary revelry of all sorts on Aug. 24. The Old Stone House is also hosting a series of activities known as Battle Week between now and Aug. 27, which you can find more information about here.

Unlike the actual battle, life and liberty aren’t at stake during any of this week’s events—something we can’t say for other areas of this country. If you want to participate in a more up-to-date expression of the uniquely American rights won during the Revolutionary War this weekend, head to Staten Island where the Rev. Al Sharpton is leading a rally and march to protest the death of Eric Garner, the Staten Island man who died after being placed in a chokehold by the NYPD.

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