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Hasbrouck House, your new Hudson Valley getaway, opens Labor Day weekend

Hasbrouck House, a two-hour drive from NYC, is a historic property that's been updated with luxe amentities, spectacular grounds and a brand-new restaurant and bar. Photo: Emma Tuccillo

Hasbrouck House, a two-hour drive from NYC, is a historic property that’s been updated with luxe amenities, newly forged trails and a brand-new restaurant and bar. Photo: Emma Tuccillo

A lake, a 55-foot pool, access to a 100-acre neighboring orchard, and miles of newly forged trails that you can explore by foot or a bicycle at the ready. Also: nightly bonfires. These are some of the things that you can enjoy at the new Hasbrouck House, a meticulously renovated historic hotel and restaurant two hours north of New York, opening September 2.

Spread over 55 acres in the Hudson Valley, the boutique hotel features 20 unique rooms and suites, centered around a 1757-built Dutch Colonial stone mansion and nearby carriage and stable houses. Each room offers a mix of vintage and modern touches, from the beautiful hardwood floors to the vintage rugs to the custom mattresses with luxe Frette Linens and marble showers filled with Kiehl’s bath products. (Some even offer fireplaces and soaking tubs.)

Its central location means you’re a short drive from hiking in the Catskills, climbing in the Gunks, or exploring Woodstock or Kingston.

You should save at least one night for the hotel’s new restaurant and bar, Butterfield at Hasbrouck House, a joint collaboration with the team behind New York City’s Comodo and Colonia Verde restaurants. Executive chef Shawn Burnette, formerly of the Breslin in Manhattan and Husk in Charleston, has revitalized the property’s original, centuries-old smokehouse and utilizes neighboring farms and orchards for his housemade lamb sausage, crispy local vegetables, and fried chicken for two, among other delicious offerings from his original, Hudson Valley-inspired menu.

The property has Brooklyn roots too—it’s owned by Gowanus Hospitality Group, whose venues, The Green Building and 501 Union, host our annual wedding fair each year. We’ll be debuting a Hudson Valley Wedding Crashers Nov. 5 at Hasbrouck House.

They’ll be hosting lots more events, like the Phoenicia Flea Sept. 3 and 4. Head up to check it out, or stay awhile and book one of their stunning rooms now.

Before dinner, order a Hudson Valley Mule made with White Pike Whiskey at the bar. All of its light fixtures and lamps (along with those in the other common spaces) were made by Materia Designs down the street from Hasbrouck House. The wallpaper was designed by Fornasetti, produced by Cole & Son in England. Photo: Emma Tuccillo

Before dinner, order a Hudson Valley Mule made with White Pike Whiskey at the bar. Once you’re in the main dining room, you’ll be in the original house built by the Hasbrouck family in 1757, older than the United States. Photo: Emma Tuccillo

 

In the Cub room, warm up by the wood-burning fireplace (or book one of the rooms with a gas fireplace). All of the light fixtures and lamps in the common spaces were made by Materia Designs down the street from Hasbrouck House. The wallpaper was designed by Fornasetti, produced by Cole & Son. Photo: Emma Tuccillo

In the Cub room, warm up by the wood-burning fireplace (or book one of the rooms with a gas fireplace). All of the light fixtures and lamps in the common spaces were made by Materia Designs down the street from Hasbrouck House. The wallpaper was designed by Fornasetti, produced by Cole & Son. Photo: Emma Tuccillo

 

Two of the suites have soaking tubs. Photo: Emma Tuccillo

Two of the suites have soaking tubs. Photo: Emma Tuccillo

 

Each room features artwork by local artists, including fine art photographer and owner of Barloga Studios, Roy Barloga, whose photographic studies are individually printed on handmade Fair Trade Nepalese paper. Photo: Emma Tuccillo

Each room features artwork by local artists, including fine art photographer and owner of Barloga Studios, Roy Barloga, whose photographic studies are individually printed on handmade Fair Trade Nepalese paper. Photo: Emma Tuccillo