Articles by

Shelby Thompson

Shelby is a freelance writer and copyeditor who lives in Greenpoint. She has been published in BUST Magazine, METAL Magazine, and manages a couple of blogs and social media for Tomorrow Lab. She maintains her day-to-day existence through membership in a long-distance book club, a fledgling poetry group, and by hanging out with Tits Ahoy - an all girls bowling team. You might also catch her at a concert or writing a review of one. Her major life goal, other than actually running the Brooklyn Half Marathon on October 10, 2015, is to get on HuffPost's The 20 Funniest Tweets From Women This Week. Follow Shelby on Twitter @Shelbsthomcat

04/26/16 9:07am
The Buca Boot has got to be one of the coolest way to haul a picnic to the beach. Photo: Buca Boot

The Buca Boot has got to be one of the coolest way to haul a picnic to the beach. Photo: Buca Boot

Pedal pushers are out in force now that spring has finally taken hold. If you’re new to cycling in the city check out our guide to getting on a bike, and even if a full-on bike commuting lifestyle isn’t for you (the sweat factor in the summer is real), it can be a real pleasure to ride around New York City for fun.

We asked local bike advocates for their favorite rides, and added in some of our personal picks as well. Strap that helmet on and give these rides a try. (more…)

Brooklyn Based delivers free daily emails about the borough's best food, events, attractions and innovators. Get Brooklyn Based in your inbox--sign up here.

11/12/15 11:39am

 

29BOOKBROWNSTEIN-facebookJumboCarrie Brownstein’s new book, Hunger Makes Me a Modern Girl, is an intimate, unapologetic welcome into the inner orbit of Sleater-Kinney, one of the most formidable rock bands of our time. Part bildungsroman, part self-portrait, Carrie (we’re on a first name basis, now, at least in my head) leads us along the winding, and often difficult path of her career to date–or should I say, careers. She is no singular talent, and her memoir makes it clear that no one creative outlet could satisfy her desire to explore.

A sense of longing or, perhaps more to the point, hunger, is the thread that successfully unifies this tale, starting with Carrie’s complicated childhood in Redmond, WA to her 42-year-old self living and working in Portland, OR. She longs to belong, to be heard, to understand, to be understood. It’s often heartbreaking to read her narration of struggling with this need, through depression, isolation and anxiety, reminding us that even when you are seemingly on top of the world, that world can feel like a garbage heap. (more…)

Brooklyn Based delivers free daily emails about the borough's best food, events, attractions and innovators. Get Brooklyn Based in your inbox--sign up here.

10/15/15 2:00pm

 

Bill T. Jones, dancer and choreographer, speaks with free-verse poet Mark Doty on Oct. 19. Photo: Bill T. Jones

Bill T. Jones, dancer and choreographer, speaks with free-verse poet Mark Doty on Oct. 19. Photo: Bill T. Jones

You know that old game where you come up with a guest list for your fantasy dinner party, choosing smart, weird and interesting people, living and dead? The New York Public Library and the Academy of American Poets have partnered on a fall series pairing contemporary poets with other creative thinkers that makes that game real, and puts the results on stage. Each duo is united by a common theme in their work, but with major differences in form, so there’s always plenty to discuss. Really, it’s more like being a fly on the wall at a coffee date you wish you had been invited to.

These hour-long conversations were curated to explore the ways that different art forms coexist with poetry in contemporary life. That may sound like a snoozefest to anyone who isn’t big into verse–I certainly had my doubts before attending the first event in the series last month, even though Jennifer Benka, the executive director of the AAP, assured me that it would be incredible. She explained that they had dispensed with moderators to create a flowing conversation in the hopes that “sometimes fireworks fly off the stage.” Despite that claim, I showed up to the first one expecting something pretty bookish–I assumed the poet would read a piece or two from her collection and then answer questions about the themes of that selected work. Instead, I found myself in a sold-out auditorium in the NYPL, held rapt by an exceptionally lively conversation.

Carrie Mae Weems, an artist who works in photography, installations and other formats, and poet Claudia Rankine, whose latest collection, Citizen: An American Lyric earned her a place as a finalist for the 2014 National Book Award, were the first two creatives to converse.  (more…)

Brooklyn Based delivers free daily emails about the borough's best food, events, attractions and innovators. Get Brooklyn Based in your inbox--sign up here.

10/13/15 9:20am

Arro_01The way we get around the city when we decide to take a car service or taxi has changed dramatically over the past year. For one, green cabs now pepper intersections in Brooklyn where hailing a taxi would have once been a fool’s errand. Hiring a car service, and paying for it with a credit card, is faster and easier than ever, and ride-sharing services and apps have popped up to save us all cash.

To figure out who offers the best ride, I downloaded Uber, Lyft, and the new NYC taxi cab app Arro on my Android, and picked locations within a comparable distance of around one mile, all in North Brooklyn–Greenpoint and Williamsburg–to make the trips as similar as possible. My criteria to compare each service was simple. In each case I noted:

1) Ease of app
2) Cost
3) Distance
4) Timeliness

I then went on a trial-by-car-service ride along to see what kind of lift I could get on a date night with my boyfriend. The plan: Meet for happy hour, followed by dinner and a movie. Our night began at duckduck bar in Bushwick (for their excellent two-for-one happy hour, which includes cheese puffs), before the movie. (more…)

Brooklyn Based delivers free daily emails about the borough's best food, events, attractions and innovators. Get Brooklyn Based in your inbox--sign up here.

08/11/15 11:37am

shutterstock_203021143

I spent a long period of time in college depending on thrift store finds at Goodwill to help define my late-90s, early 2000s style. Alongside weird junk for “decorating” my first apartment, I also prided myself on t-shirts that fell apart on my body, dresses sometimes two sizes too big (or small), and the most killer pair of low-top, yellow and orange vintage roller skates that fit me perfectly (that I wore ALL THE TIME). After I graduated, in some dumb effort to grow up, I sold the skates back to a thrift shop and tried not to look back. Worst. Mistake. Ever.

These days, I buy clothes that actually fit me, but I still thrift in search of great prices. There’s only so much online shopping you can do to find a good deal, but even more than that, every time I step into a thrift store the feeling of possibility is palpable in a way that can be addictive. Whether you’re searching for bargain on your work wardrobe, a vintage Diane Von Furstenberg dress, or the perfect pair of roller skates, half the fun of thrifting is the search.

So  I can really get behind National Thrift Store Day, which ReuseNYC is celebrating this Monday, Aug. 17, 2015. ReuseNYC member-approved shops including Beacon’s Closet, Angel Street Thrift Shop, Cure Thrift Shop, and Rags-A-GoGo, are getting in on the thrifty fun, with sales and specials. To make the most of Thrift Store Day, and to help you make shopping more of an adventure every day, I chatted with pro-thrifters, shoppers and sellers alike, about how to get the best deals, whether you’re buying, selling or browsing.  (more…)

Brooklyn Based delivers free daily emails about the borough's best food, events, attractions and innovators. Get Brooklyn Based in your inbox--sign up here.