03/02/17 1:23pm

I need to be the adult here and break it to you, someone does. Just because it was 70 last week does not mean that summer starts at the end of the month. We still have a ways to go before the glorious outdoor movies and free concerts of summer are here. Until then, you’ll have to make do with some excellent art, scary theater, absorbing new books and the return of the best show on television.

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10. The Terrifying

Everything about The Terrifying, a new play written and directed by Obie-winner Julia Jarcho sounds, well, terrifying. It’s an intimate theater experience for just 60 guests who are seated on the stage “close enough to hear a faint whisper.” The setting is described as a “creepy little village on the cusp of modernity” and there’s a warning about strong language and sudden loud noises. We’ll be reviewing so check back for the full scoop on just how scary The Terrifying really is. The show runs from March 12-April 2 at the Arbons Arts Center, and tickets are $25.


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9. Art on Paper, March 3-5
As the name would suggest, Art on Paper is a giant show devoted to art committed to paper, like drawings, prints and photos. It’s also home to an incredibly inventive collection of three-dimensional work constructed with paper and some video work as well. The show is held on Pier 36 in Manhattan, March 3-5 (with a preview on March 2), and with participating galleries around the city. A pass costs $25 for a day, $30 for three days, and $40 if you want access during the preview as well. (more…)

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03/01/17 2:25pm
It's a new leaf kinda week, right?

It’s a new leaf kinda week, right?

On this rainy yet bizarrely warm Wednesday, we’re coming off an entire week of unseasonably warn, yet undeniably pleasant weather, an Oscars ceremony with a surprise twist ending, and a presidential address marking an unexpected shift in terms of tone and sentence completion proficiency (if not actual content), and on top of all that, we’re now in a brand new month. I must admit that it all makes me feel like doing my part to change things up a little bit, too.

To that end, I’m committing to booking myself the real, no email access type vacation that I’ve been talking about for ages, and I’m going to make myself go to the gym today for the first time in so-long-that-I-don’t-even-really-know-when-the-last-time-was-but-definitely-not-in-2017. Maybe you have some stuff you’ve been putting off, and maybe this is a good week to just make it happen, whether it’s doing your taxes, or taking your pet to the vet, or any number of those mundane, adult-y tasks that pile up and make you feel increasingly uncertain about your general adulting skillset.

No cause for alarm, though, you know that we’d never suggest that you fill up all your time with boring admin–this is Your Ideal Week, after all. So try to carve out some time to check out one of the NYC Beer Week events, which run through the weekend: this Ruppert’s Cup Awards tasting at Barcade on Saturday afternoon sounds especially easygoing and fun. Or you could treat yourself to a delicious dinner out and help find hunger right here in Brooklyn by heading to one of the many participating restaurants taking part in the inaugural Brooklyn Feeds campaign this coming Tuesday night.

A couple of us here at BB have tested out Dale Talde’s giant new spot, Atlantic Social, and I can personally attest that the nachos are as good as you remember them being from Pork Slope and it’s an excellent place to watch the college basketball conference tournaments this weekend, if you’re interested in that kind of thing. We’re just getting started here–read on for a whole slew of other potential experiences and adventures that we rustled up for the coming week.  (more…)

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02/28/17 8:54am
Photo: Amanda Duarte

Photo: Amanda Duarte

We never forget the one that got away. No, I don’t mean your last Tinder date. I’m talking about missed connections of the creative variety. The song that was just a catchy chorus short of Top 40 euphoria. The webseries one clever concept away from Comedy Central success. Drafts languishing in drawers and hard drives all over the city. Murdering your darlings is essential writing advice, but sometimes you’ve got to wonder what it would be like to bring them back to life.

Amanda Duarte understands. The voice-over artist, singer, actress, and creator of the Pussy Grabs Back campaign has a monthly show called Dead Darlings, dedicated to all of those creative corpses, the ideas that were just too pretty to live.

February’s edition at the historic Judson Church began with Duarte’s rendition of the Stephen Sondheim classic, “I’m Still Here,” reengineered for life under the Trump administration. She’s an Elaine Stritch in training, and a reminder that the revolution must include humor.

After the rousing opening number, the performers and their darlings for February included work from cartoonist Emily Flake that was passed over by the New Yorker, a killed article and video short about a polyamorous commune that just happens to raise wolves by journalist Jessica Bennett (Duarte’s partner in Pussy Grab’s Back), and scenes from an abandoned play about rehab from playwright Jaclyn Backhaus. In what was perhaps the most surprising (and surprisingly emotional) moments of the night, comedian Bowen Yang lip-synced along to the infamous moment on Cycle 4 of America’s Next Top Model, when Tyra Banks screams “I was rooting for you, we were all rooting for you” at recently-eliminated model hopeful Tiffany Richardson.

I didn’t know I needed that moment in my life, but Amanda Duarte did. Post-show, I chatted with her about her inspiration for the show, what it’s like to go viral, and what’s next for Pussy Grabs Back in the Trump era. (more…)

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02/26/17 7:20pm
Photo: Velo

The No. 3 combines whiskey, tomato and basil. Photo: Bar Velo

Sometimes you’re in the mood for a cocktail, but you’re not in the mood for a bar. It happens to the best of us, especially when you’ve been living in Brooklyn for a few years and the thrill of elbowing your way past a crowd of post-collegiate revelers with no fear of hangovers for a beer-and-shot-special has faded.

Fortunately for people like us, there is no shortage of grown-up restaurants that can easily double as watering holes. Bar Velo in Williamsburg is the perfect example of such an oasis. In the former Moto space under the elevated JMZ track, Bar Velo offers well-crafted cocktails in an aesthetically pleasing setting that hasn’t changed much at all since Moto closed in the fall of 2016.

Photo: Bar Velo

It’s an inviting bar. Photo: Bar Velo

The spirit of Moto lives on at Bar Velo because it’s under the same ownership, and really, it’s more of an update than a wholesale transformation. Owner John McCormick wanted to re-open the restaurant with a fully vegetarian menu, but the space itself is nearly indistinguishable, save some new cycling-themed design touches. The striking oblong bar that serves as the space’s centerpiece remains intact, and that’s where we recommend you settle in for some adult beverages in the company of adults. As a bonus, the round-edged bar means you can get away with a party of more than two and still include everyone in the conversation. (more…)

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02/23/17 9:14am

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The Lobster Shift is a monthly column by Kenneth R. Rosen that explores the city and its inhabitants in the hours between dusk and dawn.

Nothing had yet caught fire. After my late shift, I fell fast asleep.

I’d spent the night wandering in a haze, a low mist applied across the city invariably and without discretion. I stepped around patches and had nowhere to go but home, wondering whether there was somewhere for me to be and all I’d done was forgotten it. A strange tickle lapped at my neck and I felt like someone was behind me. I turned fast. No one was there, but every few steps along Queens Boulevard I took to turning back. Checking just in case.

Eventually I found my way home, careful as I crossed the streets, dodging headlights sponged in mist. I could see a police cruiser down the block, and counseled myself, No way, it’s not for you.

This state of paranoia never settles, and is often encouraged by the anonymity of nighttime. In my bones I feel an unshakable guilt, a teasing disruption in my liver and heart, a menace trapped inside my own menace. Sometimes I misplace it and then seeing a police officer sets it upon me. The paranoia stays and becomes second-nature. It is necessary to survival. I have lived with it always.

Someone once told me that if I were to look skyward more often, into the haze above Manhattan, I would come to see more, feel more grounded, become better situated and aware of these feelings inside this unnatural spree of concrete and metal. Hear something enough and it becomes your own philosophy. I heard those words—look up, dammit, look up!—and learned that my compass relied on the two towers that could be seen from almost anywhere–The Empire State and One World Trade. There are the pencil skyscrapers, light dribbling out the windows, but nothing like these. That’s where the collective hopeful ambitions come from. Excelsior!

My childhood in the city was spent looking down, navigating cracks in the sidewalks, bursting through crowds gathered at crosswalks. I had a fast pace, strode like I belonged, moved with a purpose and, for that reason, never gleaned much of the city. So I’m starting to look up these nights, pacing around on the streets, mindless and enthralled just the same. It’s when I am in this trance that I can peer up at these buildings and see inside them vignettes of lives I will never lead. (more…)

02/22/17 2:58pm

It’s Wednesday again, which means it’s time for a new installment of Your Ideal Week, which now and for the foreseeable future will necessarily involve a smattering of #resist and #persist activities.

Speaking of which, I owe a debt of gratitude to whoever put the “refugees welcome” sign on the Statue of Liberty yesterday–that small, peaceful yet powerful act injected some hope into my day and that’s something to give thanks for. The fight for inclusion, diversity, and basic fairness marches on, but the news this week is that we are heading towards 70 degrees for the next several days…in February! Sure, it’s another sign that we are deep in the throes of a self-inflicted climate crisis that will only be hastened along by the cabal of short-sighted, incompetent goons who hold our fate in their hands, but it doesn’t mean you can’t take the opportunity to get outside and feel the warm sun on your face. Maybe it’s time to treat your vile winter hooves to a pedicure (or the revolting/fascinating experiment that is Baby Foot), or take the bike in for a tune-up, or head upstate for a hike.

Of course, there’s nothing wrong with staying in either–there are still probably a few movies you need to cram in before the Oscars on Sunday, and tomorrow is National Chili Day so it’s great time to cook up a pot of warm, stick-to-your-ribs goodness (or pick some up at The Brooklyn Star or whatever joint you prefer in your nabe). If you’re looking for something out of the ordinary to do tonight, the Greenpoint YMCA is hosting rope jumping phenom and double-world-record-holder Adrienn Banhegyi, who has performed with Cirque du Soleil and at the Rio Olympics, tonight at 7:30pm. And planning ahead for Ideal Weeks in the near future, you can count down to March Madness in person when the ACC Tournament hits the Barclays Center from March 7-11, or score a ticket to LoftOpera’s upcoming performance of Rossini’s Otello at LightSpace Studios in Bushwick on March 16, 18, 20, 23, 25, and 27. 

But until then, take a peek at our list of happenings in and around town between now and next Wednesday, and have yourself an Ideal Week, friends!

(more…)

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02/21/17 10:33am
Photo: Brooklyn Scouts

Photo: Brooklyn Scouts

Let me introduce you to the 5th Brooklyn Scouts, where their motto is “traditional scouting for everyone.”

Don’t be fooled by the word “traditional.” Part of the Baden-Powell Service Association (BPSA), an all-inclusive scouting organization that has been in existence worldwide since 1907, the 5th Brooklyn Scouts is not the gender-segregated experience that you remember from being a Cub Scout or a Brownie, and does not have the same history of discrimination against gay and transgender children and leaders. (Last month, The Boy Scouts of America finally announced that they would allow transgender boys to join.)

Just as importantly, Brooklyn Scouts seamlessly blends the joys of forest school, the community service of a social justice club, and outdoors-focused field trips, all for $180 for the entire year. Children spend a lot of time outside, and learn real skills.

The Brooklyn chapter speaks openly about their challenge to diversify in their Park Slope enclave, which is a focus for their organization this year, as well as a historical value of the organization. “Scouting has even transcended and risen above racial divisions and prejudices in the movement’s past,” says scoutmaster Jillian Tate. “Our founder, Lord Robert Baden Powell, refused to allow racial segregation in scouting until his death in 1941–even in countries like South Africa and India where the ruling colonists attempted to create all-white organizations.” (more…)

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02/20/17 9:02am
Come by for a game of shuffleboard. Photo: Georgia Kral

Come by for a game of shuffleboard. Photo: Georgia Kral

Chef Dale Talde and the Three Kings Restaurant Group may have just closed two Brooklyn establishments–Pork Slope and Thistle Hill Tavern–but they haven’t turned their backs on the borough.

Instead, they have opened Atlantic Social, a massive restaurant (130 seats) and sports bar (50 stools) that they hope will appeal to Brooklynites and guests visiting the nearby Barclays Center.

“We want this place to be for the die hard sports fan but also the people who could give two shits,” said Three Kings partner David Massoni. But “at the end of the day, you can’t deny there’s a sports bar element. There are 16 TVs.”

Sixteen televisions, indeed. Atlantic Social also boasts a game room, which Massoni says they are calling “the parlor,” with a shuffleboard table and classic arcade games like Ms. Pan-Man and Big Buck Hunter. There are leather couches and an inviting gas fireplace in the room, too. A pool table is on its way. The game room is open to anyone but can also be rented out for parties.

“We want it to be feel like a friend’s parents’ basement,” Massoni said. (more…)

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02/16/17 10:00am
Mozart's Sister - credit: Rebecca Storm

Mozart’s Sister | Photo: Rebecca Storm

If Mozart’s Sister, Canadian indie pop musician Caila Thompson-Hannant’s current project, has got you wondering whether Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart actually had a sibling, then let’s start with a quick musical history lesson. Yes, the famed composer had an older sister named Maria Anna (1751-1829). Like her brother, Maria was also a musical child prodigy who toured with Wolfgang and performed for audiences throughout Europe. Some have even said that Maria had an influence on her younger brother, according to a Smithsonian article, she transcribed Wolfgang’s first symphony, and another researcher claimed that she composed works for her brother so he could learn how to play the piano. But her music days ended when she turned 18, (and her family insisted she focus on getting married) while Wolfgang’s career continued to flourish into adulthood and eventually legend. Over time, Maria Anna’s life and contributions have surfaced in articles, books, a play, and a movie, after she had been relegated throughout history as a footnote to the career of her more famous bro.

It’s fitting that Thompson-Hannant named her project after an unsung female musician who was independently talented in her own right. For her new album, Field of Love, Thompson-Hannant called her own shots throughout production and recording. The follow-up to her 2014 full-length debut album Being, Field of Love is a celebratory, romantic electropop record: dizzying atmospheric synth sounds, infectious dance beats and Thompson-Hannant’s child-like yet soulful vocals buoy uptempo tracks like “Eternally Girl,” “My Heart Is Wild,” and “Moment 2 Moment.”

If Field of Love sounds like something out of the ’90s, that was by design–it was during that period that Thompson-Hannant developed her love for dance pop.

Thompson-Hannant, who previously played in the band Shapes and Sizes, is returning to the States for some upcoming show dates, including one at Brooklyn’s Silent Barn tonight, as well as several showcases at SXSW in March. Brooklyn Based spoke with this emerging musician who, unlike the Mozart’s actual sister, has stepped out on her own without being in someone else’s shadow. (more…)

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02/15/17 12:38pm

Insa is throwing a dance party Sunday night to raise money for refugees affected by Trump’s hideous travel ban. Video: Insa

Buenos miercoles, todos, and welcome to another edition of Your Ideal Week, our weekly roundup of eats, activities, readings, cultural events, and other gatherings happening in and around the best borough. Hope everyone survived the snowstorm OK, and maybe had a fun day off/wfh in PJs day in the process? And then of course we had Valentine’s Day, which in my case involved a sugar binge and resultant crash yesterday that was the stuff of legend. I blame it on the colleague who brought in V Day-themed pixie sticks, which I’ve always maintained is the laziest candy. Think about it: At some point someone literally sat in a Big Candy boardroom and gave this approximate pitch: “We take actual, plain sugar out of the Domino box, see, and then we dye it and put it in a rolled up piece of paper and sell it. Mic drop.” Needless to say I’m still feeling the effects. . . And now these latest revelations that Trump et al. had improper and possibly treasonous dealings with Russia, which everyone is acting surprised about for some reason even though we’ve all known this was the case the whole time. Hillary Clinton was screaming it from the rooftops during the campaign and Trump himself was joking (?) about it in tweets but now we all have to feign shock like we do when a friend’s boyfriend pops the question after they spend months picking out a ring together. Whatever, don’t hate the player, hate the game, I guess? Unless by “the player” you are referring to an elected official who deliberately compromises the safety and sovereignty of our nation, in which case, hate away. Hopefully, this will continue to erode the legitimacy of this administration and hasten the end of this nightmare without causing too much irreversible damage to US interests here and abroad, but we live in The Upside Down now, so who can say for sure?

Moving right along, this week brings (not my) President’s Day, which is a double-edged sword in 2017 as it means a reminder of the utter disaster that is currently playing out in the White House but also a long weekend. We’ll give you some great ideas of how to spend your free time between now and next Wednesday but before we get to that I wanted to let you know about Nitehawk Cinema’s upcoming Film Feast revolving around John Carpenter’s 1986 cult classic, Big Trouble in Little China. Nom Wah Tea Parlor and Lagunitas are collaborating on a five-course menu inspired by specific moments in the film, with dishes like “Chinatown Dumplings,” “Pork Chop Lost in an Alley” and “Green Eyes” (interpreted as Matcha lotus sesame balls). It will be delicious and it will definitely sell out (I’m still mad I missed the window for the Coming to America Film Feast earlier this month) so be sure to pick up a ticket now, even though the event won’t happen until April 18. Once that’s taken care of, take a gander at our picks of things to do over the course of the next seven days and, until next time, have yourself an Ideal Week! (more…)