05/19/16 1:15pm

Buy

If buying a home in Brooklyn, or anywhere in NYC seems daunting to you, you haven’t been to one of our Buying into Brooklyn sessions. Over the course of an evening, and some Brooklyn Brewery beers, you’ll get a crash course on everything you need to know before you start your apartment hunt.

On Tuesday, June 7, join us for solid advice from a team of pros—Realty Collective founder Victoria Hagman and Realty Collective agent Tina Fallon; real estate attorney Michael Moshan and Sterling National Bank mortgage bankers Mark Maimon and Gabi Feuer —in a setting that is far more relaxed than your last crowded open house.

Here’s what you’ll learn over Brooklyn beers on June. 7:
-Who protects you and helps you get the best deal
-How to position yourself as a bonafide buyer in a competitive market
-The importance of finding the right lender
-What to do when you have bad or less than stellar credit
-The steps to obtaining a pre-approval and mortgage
-The offer/acceptance process
-The difference between a condo vs. co-op (and how to pass a co-op board)

Tickets are $10 in advance, and include one beer. Doors open at 7:30pm, the evening begins shortly afterward.

Buying into Brooklyn is sponsored by:SNB Stacked Logo

04/29/16 4:13pm
Jen Dalton and Bill Powhida’s latest art project, MONTH2MONTH, brings New Yorkers together to discuss and debate the city’s housing crisis in 8 NYC apartments. Photo courtesy Jen Dalton

Jen Dalton and Bill Powhida’s latest art project, MONTH2MONTH, brings New Yorkers together to discuss and debate the city’s housing crisis in eight NYC apartments. Photo: Jemma Koo

Paycheck to paycheck, hand to mouth, month to month. All of these phrases evoke an uncertain living, but “month to month” elicits a special kind of anxiety for renters. Living month to month suggests you have no lease, no official document to protect you from the threat of eviction or a rent hike you can’t afford. Which gets at the heart of Jen Dalton and Bill Powhida’s latest project, MONTH2MONTH, a series of events that combine real estate, art and activism in eight New York City apartments.

“The name was chosen because the project events take place over the course of a month,” explained Dalton, “and also we were hoping to evoke the tenuous nature of most people’s economic situations.”

Beginning May 7 with a “housewarming party,” MONTH2MONTH will continue the ongoing dialogue of inequality and wealth disparity in New York City by inviting the public to discuss the city’s housing crisis—whether they’re affected by it or feel distanced from the issue—in luxury and affordable housing units that will be temporarily open to total strangers. The eight apartments hosting MONTH2MONTH range from a townhouse in Chelsea to an architect’s loft with an indoor pond to a tiny East Village apartment.

“It was not easy by any stretch of the imagination,” said Powhida, who has made his own affordable home one of the project sites. “It’s been a really delicate negotiation to get anyone to open up their home and share their space with the public.” (more…)

04/24/15 1:15pm
Ryan Lammie, an artist and founder of the artist collective Radiant Hall in Pittsburgh, which he calls one of the most supportive arts communities he's been a part of. Photo: Ben Filio

Ryan Lammie, an artist and founder of the artist collective Radiant Hall in Pittsburgh, which he calls one of the most supportive arts communities he’s been a part of. Photo: Ben Filio

When the borough you call home becomes known as one the most expensive places to live in America, it’s natural to look around for better alternatives. For a hot, Internet second, Buffalo—which recently made that list of cities that young college graduates are moving to—looked like a fine choice, so long as you enjoy brutal winters and more economic initiatives than jobs. But there is another metropolis the 25-34 cohort is gravitating toward that is considerably more buzzworthy, filled with James Beard Award-nominated chefs, tech startups, and the cool factor of a soon-to-open Ace Hotel. The city that holds all this promise? Pittsburgh. It claims more brainpower than Silicon Valley, based upon the number of its college-educated residents, and offers good jobs and a low cost of living for its young transplants. Think Portland, Oregon, except half the size, and with higher employment.

To find out how Pittsburgh stacks up as a second chapter for Brooklynites in search of greener pastures, I spoke to seven expats. If they all sound a little boosterish, it’s not a coincidence. Pittsburghers seem to have a hard time finding fault with their city, despite being landlocked and getting twice the amount of snow as New York City (on average). Nearly everyone I interviewed who has relocated there speaks about Steel City as if they were on the payroll of the city’s tourism board.

“For so many years, when you said Pittsburgh, the first image that popped in people’s heads was this gloomy, dreary, smog-filled city, and that’s not who we are anymore,” Alexis Tragos, 32, told me. (more…)

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06/04/14 10:02am

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On Monday night, over one hundred Brooklynites poured into Brooklyn Brewery for our latest installment of “Buying into Brooklyn,” a crash course on buying a home in our fair borough. One of our sponsors, FlatRate Moving, gave away $500 toward a move to a random winner (Congrats Alex Heim!) and our speakers, Realty Collective founder Victoria Hagman and Realty Collective agent Tina Fallon; real estate attorney and partner Michael Moshan of Gold Scollar Moshan, PLLC, and private mortgage banker Janet Younkman of Wells Fargo, offered a ton of pro tips on buying in New York’s incredibly competitive market. One solid takeaway was the fact that if you’re putting down less than other potential buyers, say 10%, you should come in with the highest offer. Explains Fallon, “You need to give the sellers a financial justification for taking a risk on you. And you need to show that the risk has a good chance of paying off, by waiving an appraisal contingency, or having a guarantor.”

Here are some other salient words of wisdom from last night’s speakers. (more…)