02/01/17 11:46am

February is historically the month of love. So, even if there are government acts to stand against, executive orders to roar about, racists to take down, and protests to march your weary legs in, make time this month for self-care. Hug your little ones close and remember to find time for art and humanity. Look for the heroes. Join a community of activists. Reach for tolerance. And whenever you need to, escape for a while into a museum or film to recharge your heart. Remember, love will always trump hate.

Show kids that making a statement doesn't have to be done on paper. 1) Charles Eisenmann (1855–1927). Nora Hildebrandt, ca. 1880. Albumen photograph mounted on cardboard. Collection of Adam Woodward. 2) Samuel O’Reilly (1854–1909). Eagle and shield, ca. 1875–1905. Watercolor, ink, and pencil on paper. Courtesy of Lift Trucks Project

Show kids that making a statement doesn’t have to be done on paper.
1) Charles Eisenmann (1855–1927). Nora Hildebrandt, ca. 1880. Albumen photograph mounted on cardboard. Collection of Adam Woodward. 2) Samuel O’Reilly (1854–1909). Eagle and shield, ca. 1875–1905. Watercolor, ink, and pencil on paper. Courtesy of Lift Trucks Project

GO: If your kids are already interested in getting some tats (or at least interested in looking at yours), let them find out more at Tattooed New York at the New York Historical Society. Highlights of the exhibit will include Thomas Edison’s electric pen and early tattoo machine, sideshow banners and lots of modern and historical tattoo art. This isn’t an interactive exhibit geared toward children, but you can easily find parts that your kids will enjoy. Bring a pocketful of temporary tattoos for your kids to choose from sothey can get in on the fun (in a less permanent way). Feb. 2 through April 29 Tattooed New York- NY Historical Society  170 Central Park West at Richard Gilder Way (77th Street), Tuesday-Thursday, Saturday – 10am-6pm, Friday – 10am-8pm, Sunday – 11am-5pm, Monday – CLOSED; adults: $20, students: $12, kids (5-13 years old) $6, kids 4 and under: free. (more…)

09/30/16 11:28am
A fire-breathing robot from last year's World Maker Faire at the Queens Hall of Science. It returns this weekend, Oct. 1-2. Photo: Velleman Store

A fire-breathing robot from last year’s World Maker Faire at the Queens Hall of Science. It returns this weekend, Oct. 1-2. Photo: Velleman Store

Halloween takes center stage this month, but there’s more to do than just eat candy and get cavities. Here are 12 (dentist approved) kids events to fill your October with autumnal fun.

  1. Go: The Maker Faire at New York Hall of Science is a must for many Brooklyn families. This year’s schedule is chock full of Minecraft, drone racing, BUST Craftacular shopping, and pop-up farms. At the Faire, kids and adults can learn to pick locks, try out enormous wheeled bicycles, and experience zero gravity. There really is something for everyone here, from the youngest makers (interested in Puppet Phactory) to the oldest (fascinated with genome editing.) Ticket packages range from whole weekend ($65 adult/ $40 child) to single day ($35 adult/ $25 child). Saturday, October 1- Sunday, October 2 New York Hall of Science 47-01 111th Street, Queens

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09/25/15 11:21am
Last year's IMC at 501 Union. This year's edition will be more intimate and focused on skill building. Photo: Alison Brockhouse

Last year’s IMC was a series of panel discussions, this year’s edition will be more intimate and focused on skill building. Photo: Alison Brockhouse

Every fall we host a conference we call Indie Media Camp to bring together independent media makers for networking, collaboration and learning. In the past, IMC has shaped up as a series of panels and talks covering everything from headline writing to online misogyny. After lots of consideration and review, we’ve decided to change it up and structure the day somewhat differently this year, to focus on intensive workshops designed to expand and hone your skills at the Made in NY Media Center by IFP in DUMBO. There will still be a keynote and a few panel discussions, but we really want our fellow independent media makers to leave IMC with new skills to bring to their own work. You can find the full schedule for Wednesday, Nov. 4 here.

The short story is that we’ll begin with a keynote address and Q&A with Clifford Levy, a New York Times masthead editor and the mastermind behind NYT Now, one of our favorite news apps. From there, we’ll break into small groups of about 20 people for three hands-on classes covering podcasting, photography and social media. We’ll finish the day with panels on the state of freelancing and what it means to make it in media in 2015. Throughout we’ve got breakfast, lunch and a happy hour with snacks covered. We’re very excited about this new format and about the fantastic instructors and speakers we’ve lined up to help you expand your skill set and meet fellow storytellers, journalists, and digital media entrepreneurs.

A limited number of early bird tickets are available now, so get ’em while they last.

 

09/16/14 7:22am

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It’s #BYOBag Week here in New York, an initiative designed to encourage us all to examine our plastic bag using and abusing ways. We have six suggestions for totes that will make you forget plastic even exists, including our own version. The Brooklyn Based tote bag, which weighs practically nothing, holds a ton of groceries or vegetables from the farmer’s market, and is easily stashed in your messenger bag, backpack or purse. And when you spot a fellow Brooklyn Based reader wearing one of these, you’ll know you’re kindred spirits. They’re standard Baggu bags, available in cobalt with white printing or smoke with orange printing, for $15, including shipping. You’ll use this every day, we promise.


Colors



10/07/13 7:00am

Bring your own booze to Grilled artichokes with saffron aioli at Bistro Petit (Photo courtesy Bistro Petit / Todd Barndollar)

Adding on an appetizer like the grilled artichokes with saffron aioli at Bistro Petit feels like less of an indulgence when you bypass the drink bill by bringing your own booze. Photo: Bistro Petit/Todd Barndollar

If you’re a regular reader, you know I like to complain about the Manhattanization of our menu pricing here in Brooklyn. As the local restaurant scene continues to boom, it seems to become harder and harder to find an affordable meal. Plenty of great meals, yes, but with the new normal being checks that come out to $50 per person, we’re always looking for ways to cut corners, one of them being the borough’s few great BYOB restaurants. Especially at an upscale eatery, the ability to bring your own bottle can make the difference between a reasonable check and an outrageous one, which is the reason why these four spots will always be among my favorite standbys since they allow outside alcohol and don’t charge corkage fees for wine. Thanks to reader Cliff Fisch for requesting this story–ask and ye shall receive!

1. Kaz An Nou

The area around Barclays Center is adding generic, mediocre restaurants at a frenetic pace, but this is one that still feels like a secret neighborhood gem. The dark, French bistro atmosphere is paired with an inventive menu influenced by the Caribbean isle of Guadeloupe, where the chef and owner Sebastian Aubert hails from. Dishes like duck confit with mango jerk sauce and lime-poached tilapia over coconut rice are all $20 or less, so paired with your own bottle of wine, that’s about as cheap as you’re gonna get for cuisine this refined. Bonus: The airy back patio has just one long picnic table: a perfect private spot for a birthday dinner, especially since you can bring your own booze and avoid the whole “who had drinks, who didn’t” check-splitting fiasco. (more…)

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08/20/13 10:17am

Delayed almost a year by Hurricane Sandy, William Durney is ready to bring his twist on barbecue to Red Hook. Photo: Hometown BBQ

Delayed almost a year by Hurricane Sandy, William Durney is ready to bring his twist on barbecue to Red Hook. Photo: Hometown BBQ

When the floodwaters from Hurricane Sandy receded from Red Hook last fall, it wasn’t just neighborhood favorites like Red Hook Lobster Pound, Bait and Tackle and Fort Defiance that suffered setbacks from the storm. Nearly a year later, a number of restaurants that were weeks away from opening when the storm hit are finally ready to join the area’s once-again thriving food scene.

We learned about the brisket and imminent opening of Hometown BBQ in  yesterday’s Brooklyn BBQ roundup, but what it took owner William Durney to get his eatery up and running is another story in itself. He’s part of a new wave of Red Hook restaurateurs—that includes Erin Norris of Grindhaus, Eric Finkelstein and Matt Ross of Court Street Grocers and Frank Castronovo and Frank Falcinelli of Res, an event space and chef’s residency concept that’s still under wraps on Columbia Street—stalled by Sandy but set to open in the next few weeks. (more…)

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08/06/13 2:00pm
Wed August 7, 2013
New Orleans funk band Galactic kicks off their four-day residency at Brooklyn Bowl this Wednesday. Photo credit: Zach Smith

New Orleans funk band Galactic kicks off its four-day residency at Brooklyn Bowl this Wednesday. Photo credit: Zach Smith

Calling New Orleans jazz-funk band Galactic energetic is like saying Quentin Tarantino films are a tad violent. The band has been performing in Louisiana’s party capital since 1996, and their tunes are as bright and lively as a Mardi Gras float, with sizzling vocals, thunderous drum lines and a rumbling brass section. Their latest album, 2012’s Carnivale Electricos is full of tightly-packed sonic jewels and world-beat infusions, and pays tuneful homage to New Orleans’ Mardi Gras festivals as well as the epic carnivals in Brazil and Trinidad, where one day isn’t a lengthy enough celebration. The same can be said about Galactic’s stint at Brooklyn Bowl: the band begins its four-day stay at the venue this Wednesday, Aug. 7. You can grab tickets for individual shows at $15 each, but get ’em quick–four-day passes are sold out. If you can’t get tickets before they’re all gone, here’s some of the week’s best concerts you can still check out.

08/06/13 12:00pm
Thu August 8, 2013
Smooth-singing 1970s R&B musician Shuggie Otis plays a free show at the Metrotech Commons in Downtown Brooklyn this Thursday.

Smooth-singing 1970s R&B musician Shuggie Otis plays a free show at the Metrotech Commons in Downtown Brooklyn this Thursday.

As we creep slowly through the last breath of summer, we’re all looking for an excuse to play hooky from work. Here’s a really good one: 1970s R&B singer and multi-instrumentalist Shuggie Otis brings his soulful groove to a free show at the Metrotech Commons (the corner of Flatbush and Myrtle avenues) in Downtown Brooklyn this Thursday, Aug. 8. The catch? It’s smack dab in the middle of the work day. Touring in support of his recently re-released cult classic Inspiration Information, Otis is a masterful musician who started gigging with his father, R&B legend Johnny Otis, before he was old enough to get into the music clubs he played at. This event, which starts at noon, is the last in BAM’s free summer R&B Festival at Metrotech, and with Otis on stage, the series isn’t going out quietly. So go ahead and take a long lunch or use one of those sick days you’ve saved up and settle in for some silky smooth afternoon delight.

08/02/13 9:11am


August may be upon us, but summer’s not over quite yet. We scoured the web–while in the comfort of air conditioning–to find July’s 10 best in-depth stories from Brooklyn Based, Narratively and beyond. Before you soak up the last of your friends’ rooftop soirées and backyard barbecues, you’ll want to stick these stories in your back pocket for the coolest conversation starters around.

1. Livestock Orphans

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A sanctuary fit for a goat. Photo: Courtney Dudley

What happens when all those well-meaning Brooklyn locavores get tired of their pet pigs, backyard chickens and adopted goats? Narratively visited the upstate farm that takes in these urban animal orphans.

2. Hairy Fairy

It’s been the summer of Cera. Not only has the endearingly awkward actor appeared in the new season of Arrested Development; he’s also the star of low budget, indie festival favorite Crystal Fairy, conceived by Fort Greene filmmaker Sebastián Silva and inspired by a similarly transformative road trip that he endured.

3. For the Mockingbirds

The New York Times investigated recent attacks on innocent sunbathers by mockingbirds gone cuckoo to protect their hatchlings.
4. Mad World

Illustration courtesy of Narratively/Keny Widjaja

Illustration courtesy of Narratively/Keny Widjaja


Narratively took a close look at a Bushwick artists’ commune whose eclectic residents gained more than just inspiration during their stay.
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07/31/13 1:40pm

It’s a happy accident that this week’s show recommendations begin with a mellow evening at one of my favorite more intimate venues and grow in literal and auditory dimensions, culminating with three big, stadium-sized, stiletto-heeled kicks in the pants (if you can swing Beyoncé’s steep ticket prices), with boisterous pop rock, legendary soul swagger and dance-ready arrangements along the way.

BEST 1990s THROWBACK
Beth Orton
Wednesday, July 31
8:30pm
Tickets $30
The Bell House (149 7th St.)

Folk music mingles with electronica in the hands of English singer-songwriter and 1990s mainstay Beth Orton. The often moody electronic elements combined with Orton’s haunting, signature vocal lilt made her tunes ideal for early aughts film and television soundtracks like Vanilla Sky and Roswell. Orton’s recent releases rest more heavily on her folk inclinations, which we hear with rich and poignant precision on her latest album, 2012′s Sugaring Season. Her voice still bears the influences of Joni Mitchell and Nick Drake, but with a maturity and plainspoken honesty earned after almost 20 years in the biz.
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